Cinnamon Oil the best Fungicidal Oil

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This topic contains 7 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Vegan Catlady 5 years ago.

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  • #116694

    dvjorge
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    I knew it but was reading an article and brought here a fragment. Yes, Cinnamon Bark Oil is the best essential oil against candida. Totally cidal.!

    Minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) is defined as the lowest concentration of oil resulting in the death of 99.9% of the inoculum. All the oils inhibiting growth showed fungicidal activity except Jasmine and Lavender oils. In general, it was observed that the fungicidal concentration was higher than MIC, except in a few cases like Peppermint, Geranium, Ocimum, Clove and Gingergrass oils, which caused the death of 99.9% of the inoculum at MIC. According to their MFC against ATCC10231, effective oils could be classified into three classes. The oils that caused fungicidal effect at 0.03–0.15% concentration are considered as the most effective (ME) ones. Oils requiring 0.15–1.0% concentration are included in the moderately effective group (MoE). Those found fungicidal at more than 1.0% concentration are considered as less effective (LE).

    Seven oils were found to be most effective (ME) (Tables 2 and 3). Cinnamon oil was the best, having fungicidal effect at 0.03% concentration in all four isolates of C. albicans. Clove oil was fungicidal at 0.12% concentration and there was no difference between MIC and MFC. In the majority of the ME oils, a 2–4-fold of MIC, was required for fungicidal effect. The response of Candida isolates to some members of this group was divergent, i.e., of strain CA II in the case of Japanese mint oil and Gingergrass oil, CA III in the case of Lemongrass oil and CA IV in the case of Ginger grass oil (Table

    Jorge.

    #116696

    Vegan Catlady
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    Excellent info. Really does confirm alot.

    #116711

    jameskep
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    I’m sure Cinnamon bark oil would kill as much good bacteria as it would candida. Its a very harsh oil and would not recommend it internally. Cinnamon oil can cause extreme gut irritation/inflammation(internally). I have done a drop(diluted) in the past and I would never do it again. With a topical infection it would cause too much burning and inflammation. It might be worth a try for a oral rinse.

    Do you have the study/article? Curious with how they did the study and the results with lavender?

    The problem with some of the lab tests is that it doesn’t show how much damage it can do to the good flora. These lab tests are very limited because they are done for such a short period of time. Some of these substances might be really effective for candida for a few weeks and then end up being ineffective after a month. I wish they would do more long term lab tests with anti-fungals to see how the candida adapts/resilience towards the anti-fungal. The lab test may just give us a indication of what it is capable of doing but no definitive long-term results.

    #116716

    Vegan Catlady
    Member
    Topics: 34
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    jameskep;55232 wrote: I’m sure Cinnamon oil would kill as much good bacteria as it would candida. Its a very harsh oil and would not recommend it internally. Cinnamon oil can cause extreme gut irritation/inflammation(internally). I have done a drop(diluted) in the past and I would never do it again. With a topical infection it would cause too much burning and inflammation. It might be worth a try for a oral rinse.

    Do you have the study/article? Curious with how they did the study and the results with lavender?

    I do cinnamon oil in the form of a breath-spray almost every day.
    I am sure it is very diluted,
    I couldnt imagine what it would be like to ingest cinnamon oil without proper dilution.

    I believe it is responsible for eliminating my esophageal candida, which needs aggressive treatment .

    #116730

    dvjorge
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    Vegan Catlady;55237 wrote:

    I’m sure Cinnamon oil would kill as much good bacteria as it would candida. Its a very harsh oil and would not recommend it internally. Cinnamon oil can cause extreme gut irritation/inflammation(internally). I have done a drop(diluted) in the past and I would never do it again. With a topical infection it would cause too much burning and inflammation. It might be worth a try for a oral rinse.

    Do you have the study/article? Curious with how they did the study and the results with lavender?

    I do cinnamon oil in the form of a breath-spray almost every day.
    I am sure it is very diluted,
    I couldnt imagine what it would be like to ingest cinnamon oil without proper dilution.

    I believe it is responsible for eliminating my esophageal candida, which needs aggressive treatment .

    I am not telling you to do it.! I am telling you what I have done. I have taken until four capsules of Cinnamon Bark Oil a day diluted in olive oil. I do the capsules myself using 3 drops of Cinnamon Bark Oil. I don’t use the Cinnamon Leaf Oil but the bark. The leaf is rich in Eugenol but the bark contains Cinamaldehyde that is a tremendous fungicidal substance. Kill candida like few products. By the way, I have made mixed capsules using Pogostemon Oil with Cinnamon Oil and Olive Oil.

    Mechanisms, clinically curative effects, and antifungal activities of cinnamon oil and pogostemon oil complex against three species of Candida.
    Wang GS1, Deng JH, Ma YH, Shi M, Li B.
    Author information
    Abstract
    The anti-fungus mechanisms and curative effects of cinnamon oil and pogostemon oil complexes towards intestinal Candida infections were investigated. We measured the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of the complexes against Candida using proportionally-diluted test-tube medium, and examined the evolution of the morphology and structures of Candida albicans using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM). We found that the average MIC values of the complexes against the fungi were 0.064 mg/mL (cinnamon oil), 0.032 mg/mL (pogostemon oil) for Candida albicans, 0.129 mg/ mL (cinnamon oil), 0.064 mg/mL (pogostemon oil) for Candida tropicalis, and 0.129 mg/mL (cinnamon oil), 0.064 mg/mL (pogostemon oil), for Candida krusei. SEM examination over a 24-48 h period showed that the morphology of Candida albicans cells changed significantly. Irregular hollows appeared on the surfaces, inside organelles were destroyed and the cells burst after treatment. TEM examination over a 48 – 72 h period indicated that the cell walls were damaged, organelles were destroyed and most cytoplasms became empty bubbles. Sixty intestinal Candida-infected patients were treated with a capsule containing cinnamon and pogostemon oil. The curative ratio was 71.67% (43/60), and the improvement ratio was 28.33% (17/ 60), giving a total ratio of 100%. Thus, the cinnamon oil and pogostemon oil complexes had strong anti-fungus effects against Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, and Candida krusei. They impacted the morphology and sub-micro structures of the fungus within 48 – 72 h, and eventually denatured and killed the cells. The complexes have also shown considerable curative effects to intestinal Candida infections.

    Jorge.

    #116732

    Vegan Catlady
    Member
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    Jorge, I have seen a difference just with cinnamon powder added to food as a spice.

    I imagine that your choices are significantly stronger,probably faster.

    Have you experienced any issues after this treatment with your beneficial bacteria?

    I am only asking because I ingest cinnamon as a spice several times a day in cooking, and the cinnamon oil is sometimes an ingredient in the processed teas that I get from the grocery store.

    I am not at all experiencing the typical issues found with a decline in beneficial bacteria. Yet.

    #116842

    jameskep
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    Topics: 25
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    I wouldn’t do cinnamon oil of any kind internally. I could see it doing more harm than good. I think it would not only wipe out the good with the bad but also cause more gut irritation/inflammation than for what its worth. Its pure speculation when the lab results don’t show the effects that it can have on good flora as well. Not to mention the potential Gut irritation and inflammation that it could cause. People that have any kind of a sensitive gut will have trouble using the oil.

    #116850

    Vegan Catlady
    Member
    Topics: 34
    Replies: 626

    jameskep;55363 wrote: I wouldn’t do cinnamon oil of any kind internally. I could see it doing more harm than good. I think it would not only wipe out the good with the bad but also cause more gut irritation/inflammation than for what its worth. Its pure speculation when the lab results don’t show the effects that it can have on good flora as well. Not to mention the potential Gut irritation and inflammation that it could cause. People that have any kind of a sensitive gut will have trouble using the oil.

    Personally, I think essential oils of all kinds have the potential to be mis-used by people who equate plants/foods with being safe.

    In my henna biz, other artists are using oils on people to get good color, when they are seriously going to hurt someone!

    My only question here, is that if someone is having a good reaction to cinnamon (in any form), how is it different than other antifungals like oregano oil?

    I heard both good and very bad things about oregano oil as well.

    If we are regularly re-inoculating ourselves with good bacteria, shouldnt this off-set the use of cinnamon?
    Or is the use of cinnamon residual and/or builds-up?
    Im asking because I use alot of it…and thought maybe you had access to info that i do not.

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