Candiad & auto-immune disorders

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This topic contains 11 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  dvjorge 6 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #79998

    nai16
    Member
    Topics: 6
    Replies: 7

    Hello everyone,

    I would first like to briefly introduce myself. I am a 33 year old girl living in Australia (though I am originally from Argentina & Germany). I have had blocked sinuses since the age of 17 (which affected me strongly since I was going to become a classical singer and this forced me to change my career drastically – I am a geologist now!). Then, at the age of 26, I was diagnosed with Myasthenia Gravis. This is an auto-immune disease which is still poorly understood, but there is some evidence that causes could include exposure to prolonged stress (I had that for over 12 months while finishing my thesis at uni) and, as a consequence, poor adrenal functions, and manganese deficits. I had my thymus gland removed in 2005. My symptoms (arm and leg weakness and fatigue, slight sleep disorders) have remained relatively mild and unchanged for the last 8 years or so, and I am on the lightest possible medication (pyridostigmine bromide, no prednisone thankfully!). I had my first case of thrush also about 8 years ago, initially only after antibiotics. Lately I have had thrush recurrences without taking any antibiotics, which is what alarmed me and prompted me to research Candida, and eventually find this site. I am now slightly overweight (156cm tall, 65kg), but only four years ago I weighed up to 79 kg, and have lingered around 70 for many a while. I did the spit test and it looks like I might have quite a bit of Candida, so I decided, together with my partner, to give this diet a shot. Today is day one on stage one!

    I was just wondering if there is anyone out there who has any experience with, or knowledge of, the interactions between Candida and auto-immune diseases. Has anyone had their symptoms improve or disappear after successfully combating Candida? I am really hoping that this is going to at least help me restore the autoimmune balance in my body, and clear my sinuses – it would be so great to be able to breath and sing freely again after almost 17 years!!

    Thank you very much

    #80000

    Able900
    Spectator
    Topics: 92
    Replies: 4811

    Hello, welcome to the forum.

    I did the spit test and it looks like I might have quite a bit of Candida, so I decided, together with my partner, to give this diet a shot. Today is day one on stage one!

    I’m not saying that you don’t have a Candida overgrowth, but the spittle test isn’t worth the time it takes to do it.
    Info: Spittle Test

    I was just wondering if there is anyone out there who has any experience with, or knowledge of, the interactions between Candida and auto-immune diseases.

    It isn’t uncommon for the two to appear during the same period.

    Has anyone had their symptoms improve or disappear after successfully combating Candida?

    Speaking for myself, I cured my infestation last year. Several members here are on the verge of being cured; some have thought their infestation was cured but didn’t wait long enough to add the more ‘dangerous’ foods in which case the Candida returned. Once you have a bad case of Candida overgrowth, you’ll be susceptible to it for an indefinite length of time.

    Below is a link to some reports of improvements of the forum members.
    Stories of Success

    Eating the very same diet which played a hand in causing the overgrowth in the first place will of course do the same thing all over again.

    am really hoping that this is going to at least help me restore the autoimmune balance in my body, and clear my sinuses – it would be so great to be able to breath and sing freely again after almost 17 years!!

    There are a few posts that will introduce you to the forum’s protocol and explain how it works.

    Let us know if you have questions, there’s always someone around to help you out.

    The Protocol

    Die-Off Toxins

    Index of Forum Posts

    Able

    #80003

    dvjorge
    Participant
    Topics: 283
    Replies: 1369

    nai16 wrote: Hello everyone,

    I would first like to briefly introduce myself. I am a 33 year old girl living in Australia (though I am originally from Argentina & Germany). I have had blocked sinuses since the age of 17 (which affected me strongly since I was going to become a classical singer and this forced me to change my career drastically – I am a geologist now!). Then, at the age of 26, I was diagnosed with Myasthenia Gravis. This is an auto-immune disease which is still poorly understood, but there is some evidence that causes could include exposure to prolonged stress (I had that for over 12 months while finishing my thesis at uni) and, as a consequence, poor adrenal functions, and manganese deficits. I had my thymus gland removed in 2005. My symptoms (arm and leg weakness and fatigue, slight sleep disorders) have remained relatively mild and unchanged for the last 8 years or so, and I am on the lightest possible medication (pyridostigmine bromide, no prednisone thankfully!). I had my first case of thrush also about 8 years ago, initially only after antibiotics. Lately I have had thrush recurrences without taking any antibiotics, which is what alarmed me and prompted me to research Candida, and eventually find this site. I am now slightly overweight (156cm tall, 65kg), but only four years ago I weighed up to 79 kg, and have lingered around 70 for many a while. I did the spit test and it looks like I might have quite a bit of Candida, so I decided, together with my partner, to give this diet a shot. Today is day one on stage one!

    I was just wondering if there is anyone out there who has any experience with, or knowledge of, the interactions between Candida and auto-immune diseases. Has anyone had their symptoms improve or disappear after successfully combating Candida? I am really hoping that this is going to at least help me restore the autoimmune balance in my body, and clear my sinuses – it would be so great to be able to breath and sing freely again after almost 17 years!!

    Thank you very much

    There is an strong link between CRC and autoimmune diseases. Candida Albicans can suppress cell-mediated immunity and down regulate the suppressor cells. The suppressor cells are those that regulate an immune response against our own tissues and organs.
    Jorge.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC358175/

    #80007

    nai16
    Member
    Topics: 6
    Replies: 7

    Thank you guys, appreciate the information! I will keep browsing the forum pages to learn more, and questions are bound to arise!

    #89984

    bunda
    Member
    Topics: 0
    Replies: 2

    Dear nai16 –

    Did you have any luck with this diet helping with your MG symptoms since your initial post?

    #90023

    nai16
    Member
    Topics: 6
    Replies: 7

    Hello Bunda,

    I have followed the web site diet ( not The “strict” one) for about 7-8 weeks quite strictly, including the antifungal and probiotic treatment, and I belive that i have managed to defeat my candida problem. I had die off symptoms for several weeks, unlike the shorter experience of other people, and when they started to abate was when i came off my diet. I had since a blood test done and candida came up just barely positive, but my naturopath reckoned that this is probably a fade-off effect not to worry about. Certainly my thrush has disappeared and i feel a lot better.

    Getting to your question, though, my MG symptoms have remained the same. I have, however, also found out through variuos blood and sugar intake tests that i also suffer from “leaky gut syndrome”, of which you probably have heard already in this website. The implications of this is that foreign particles are leaking into my bloodstream and possibly triggering auto- immune reactions, which obviously is very likely to have an interplay with the MG. i have found a place in Melbourne that has sent me a set of supplements and dietary instructions to combat the leaky gut specifically, a treatment that will take about 8 weeks. I am on a holiday at the moment, but in a few weeks i will tackle this problem next, and then see if it affects/ improves my myasthenia. If you like, i will report back to you on the results.

    I hope this helped! Do you also suffer from MG? If yes, how is yours going?

    All the best,
    Natacha

    #90064

    flailingWcandi
    Member
    Topics: 13
    Replies: 277

    dvjorge wrote:
    There is an strong link between CRC and autoimmune diseases. Candida Albicans can suppress cell-mediated immunity and down regulate the suppressor cells. The suppressor cells are those that regulate an immune response against our own tissues and organs.
    Jorge.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC358175/

    Wouldn’t this tie into adrenal fatigue/hypothyroid since the endocrine systems play an important role in regulating the immune system through hormones?

    From my understanding it’s almost impossible to NOT have a compromised immune system by the time CRC happens, since a faltering immune system is what allows it to get out of control. To me this suggests adrenal/thyroids are a component to solving this puzzle – tail chasing: what came first scenarios. I’m leaning towards the endocrine systems being the first to crash in the chain reaction but, that just this week. ha!

    As always, Jorge thank you for sharing your generous and informative insight.

    Natacha – you are correct in how leaky gut is part of this syndrome from my understanding but, I wouldn’t say foreign particles since they are mostly large molecule food particles the body doesn’t recognize as food and mounts an immune response to what it thinks are invaders. Think leaky gut causes much of the histamine reactions typical of CRC sufferers.

    Blessings

    #90096

    orka1998
    Participant
    Topics: 53
    Replies: 673

    Hello nai16,

    Can you please report if your auto-immune symptoms changed after treating leaky gut?

    Also, I wanted to ask you about your symptoms. I googled your condition and it does not mention blockage of sinuses. I did have that but it is mostly gone after maintaining a strict diet for 5 months. It does come back when I eat something wrong, but I should say that I did not finish my treatment due to other symptoms that came up. Currently I am on web site’s diet with lots of protein (unfortunately it seems that nothing but fatty meat/fatty fish will keep my muscles in decent shape) and about two dinner plates of dark green leafy veggies and about a plate of colored veggies (kind of combined this diet with Dr. Wahls who got herself up after being bedridden with MS). I was diagnosed with Polymiosits, auto-immune disease where your body attacks muscle tissue. Now, some symptoms are not typical, I do have muscle pain occasionally besides the weakness, and sometimes my muscles are weak right from the morning, not only at the end of the day. Blood test did not confirm the diagnosis, but the EMG did (according to doctors). I was trying to get the muscle biopsy test done, but my cousin who is also a pathologist said that it does not actually confirm the disease because it differs greatly from spot to spot to where the sample was taken. A cm away disease could be shown but on another centimeter it may not exist so it’s a lottery what I understand.

    Finally getting to my question. I have muscle weakness in arms and legs and sinus blockage (very bad before, now just sometimes after eating more of carbs than I should) which you stated have as well. I do not think that I have any problem with eye muscle, my eyelids are not drooping, but my eyes do get tired during the day although I stare at computer screen for living so… Can you please describe your symptoms a little more? I worry that I was misdiagnosed (what a surprise) so this is why I ask.

    I am not taking corticosteroids prescribed and finally I got a naturopathic doctor and nutritionist recommended to me so I will try to get myself back in shape this way.

    Thank you in advance for responding!

    Arijana

    #90496

    bunda
    Member
    Topics: 0
    Replies: 2

    Hi Natacha,

    Thanks so much for your response. I do have MG – just ocular, but it is quite debilitating as it causes extreme eye fatigue, dizziness and double vision, which I think in turn causes chronic fatigue. I’m 32 and was diagnosed a little over 2 years ago and take mestinon to control the symptoms although it doesn’t do much to help.

    I have several other symptoms that led me to the candida diet (such as coated tongue, sore throat, dizziness, fatigue, oily skin, eczema, bloating, blurred vision, poor memory/confusion, cravings for sugar and alcohol, sinusitis, anxiety, etc) and I’ve been following the diet very strictly for two weeks now. So far I feel very tired and I’m experiencing quite a bit of overall muscle weakness. I have been continuing my regular workout routine, and I have lost about 5 pounds on the diet – so I’m guessing the weight loss might be connected to the fatigue. At times I need to literally lie down and rest I am so tired and weak, typically in the afternoons around 2/3, but sometimes this feeling lasts all day. I’m taking probiotics and anti fungals but have not had any other serious die-off symptoms that everyone is talking about – maybe it has yet to kick in, or perhaps candida is not my problem, it’s very hard to know.

    My MG symptoms have stayed the same for the duration of the two weeks, although at times it’s like a curtain lifting, and my vision is clear and I feel stable and strong and energetic. I am going to persist with the diet for at least 6 weeks to see if I notice an improvement. Sadly I was sort of hoping this might be my problem since it at least has a fix – if not I will be back at the drawing board trying to understand why I suffer from all of these ailments.

    I’d be really interested to know how the leaky gut treatment goes – please keep in touch!

    Thanks,
    B

    #90519

    nai16
    Member
    Topics: 6
    Replies: 7

    Hello Arijana and Bunda,

    first of all, sorry for the late reply (to Arijana particularly) – as soon as I have came back from my holidays I came down with the flu and I am only now getting back on my feet!

    I have not started my leaky gut diet yet, I will do this in two weeks time when my visiting parents leave and there aren’t so many culinary temptations around anymore. I must admit that I am surprised, incidentally, how much better I am dealing with “naughty” food, in terms of symptoms such as bloatedness/unwellness, since I have come of the candida diet a few weeks ago. I have been drinking small amounts of alcohol almost daily for the last 4 weeks, including beer, and have had barely any bloatedness, which I used to get quite regularly before the diet. I have kept other sugars and wheat and dairy products to a minimum, but it is good to see at least some initial improvements and enjoy a small respite before the next phase of hard work!

    Now to your questions, though. My MG symptoms are mainly arm and leg weakness and fatigue, which are quite distinct from each other and can, but do not necessarily, appear at the same time. From what I read, many people start off with ocular MG and then progress to a generalized version, but I seem to have started off straight away with the full-blown version, so I think that it is not necessary to have significant eye problems before the extremity muscles are affected by MG. I do occasionally get a slight eye lid fatigue, which I normally only notice because I am straining myself unconsciously by trying to keep my eyes open at normal levels instead of letting them drop! But this is, in my case, a minor symptom which has never yet developed into double vision or dizziness; once I realize what is happening, I just let my eye lids drop to half-way, and after a while (up to 1-2 hours) the problem generally disappears. Arm and leg weakness manifests itself mostly after sudden bursts of activity like in sports, or after I have been straining my muscles for a while. A typical example for that is climbing up stairs or mountains – by the time I climb down, my upper leg muscles are struggling to keep up and have a tendency to give in if I bend my legs too much. Fiddling with small objects seems to also provoke weakness in my hands/arms. Arm/leg fatigue, on the other hand, can appear anytime, and is more prominent during the days before my period and when I am infected with the flu etc. (weakness as well). My muscles then just feel tired, even if I am not! Other symptoms which have appeared, or got worse, since I had myasthenia, are sleep apnoea and muscle “burning”. The latter is not described as a typical symptom of MG, and I am hoping that it might be caused by the leaky gut, and fixed by the treatment I will soon undergo. Finally, the blocked sinuses/nose problem I have had for several years longer than my MG symptoms, so I am not sure to which extent they are related. Arijana, I would be really interested in hearing about the details of the diet you followed to rid yourself of your sinus problems. In my case, there has been no response whatsoever to changes in diet as yet – but I have never stayed on a diet for longer than 7-8 weeks, which was the candida diet from the web site.

    So Arijana, I think from what you describe that there is a chance that some of your symptoms might be caused by MG if the polymiositis does not explain it. Perhaps you should get a neurologist to test for it? I reacted to Mestinon straight away, and was also lucky to have a positive result in my blood test, which is not always the case with all myasthenics. Let me know how you went.

    Bunda, it took me also a while until the die-off symptoms appeared, and they lasted for a lot longer too than most people report, so I wouldn’t give up just yet. I know what you mean though, it is so hard to pinpoint what exactly is causing which symptoms, and easy to get demotivated! But we have no other choice than to try to remove, one by one, possible candidates and hang in while we assess the results… I was also hoping that Candida was the cause of all of my “hard to assign” symptoms, and it certainly was part of the cause. Now my hope is turned to the Leaky Gut issue – lets see what comes next ☺

    I will get back to you as soon as I have any results from my leaky gut diet. Thanks for your feedback and detailed descriptions, it really helps to hear of other people with similar sets of ailments and see how they deal with them!

    Natacha

    #90559

    dvjorge
    Participant
    Topics: 283
    Replies: 1369

    flailingWcandi wrote:

    There is an strong link between CRC and autoimmune diseases. Candida Albicans can suppress cell-mediated immunity and down regulate the suppressor cells. The suppressor cells are those that regulate an immune response against our own tissues and organs.
    Jorge.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC358175/

    Wouldn’t this tie into adrenal fatigue/hypothyroid since the endocrine systems play an important role in regulating the immune system through hormones?

    From my understanding it’s almost impossible to NOT have a compromised immune system by the time CRC happens, since a faltering immune system is what allows it to get out of control. To me this suggests adrenal/thyroids are a component to solving this puzzle – tail chasing: what came first scenarios. I’m leaning towards the endocrine systems being the first to crash in the chain reaction but, that just this week. ha!

    As always, Jorge thank you for sharing your generous and informative insight.

    Natacha – you are correct in how leaky gut is part of this syndrome from my understanding but, I wouldn’t say foreign particles since they are mostly large molecule food particles the body doesn’t recognize as food and mounts an immune response to what it thinks are invaders. Think leaky gut causes much of the histamine reactions typical of CRC sufferers.

    Blessings

    Yes, this is what happens:

    Chronic antigenemia, occurring naturally or
    induced experimentally, may result in immunologic
    unresponsiveness to specific
    antigens, including those of infectious origin.
    Antigens that evoke a normal immune response
    initially may induce immunologic tolerance
    when antigenic exposure becomes of the
    quantity and duration critical to its
    establishment. With its immunologic defenses
    neutralized, the host becomes incapable of
    eliminating from its tissues the source of
    tolerizing antigen, insuring perpetuation of the
    compromised immune response and persistence
    in the tissues of the infectious agent.
    Total loss of immune capability is suggested
    by the terms “immunologic paralysis” and
    “immunologic unresponsiveness”; “immunologic
    tolerance” may perhaps better describe a
    continuing but ineffectual immune response that
    “tolerates” rather than rejects the organism. The
    “ebb and flow” in the opposing forces of foreign
    invasion and immune rejection is reflected
    clinically in the remissions and exacerbations
    characteristic of many chronic illnesses. The
    incompleteness of “paralysis” is suggested by
    fluctuations both in clinical manifestations and
    in such simple tests of normal immune activity
    as the white blood cell count, skin test response,
    body temperature, and antibody titer, as well as
    by the inconstancy of indicators of abnormal
    immunologic activity, e.g., immune complex
    deposition, RA factor, LE cell, ANA. The
    pattern of the clinical response may undergo
    constant change as the immune system reacts
    both normally and abnormally to the qualitative
    and quantitative variations in antigenic
    stimulation.
    Persistence of Candida albicans in the tissues
    for prolonged periods typifies these principles.
    Chronic symptoms representing systemic
    responses to soluble yeast products accompany
    manifestations referable to the infected sites.
    Both fluctuate according to the effectiveness of a
    weakened immune response that is often
    influenced by factors directly favorable to yeast
    growth.

    Jorge.

    #90560

    dvjorge
    Participant
    Topics: 283
    Replies: 1369

    flailingWcandi wrote:

    There is an strong link between CRC and autoimmune diseases. Candida Albicans can suppress cell-mediated immunity and down regulate the suppressor cells. The suppressor cells are those that regulate an immune response against our own tissues and organs.
    Jorge.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC358175/

    Wouldn’t this tie into adrenal fatigue/hypothyroid since the endocrine systems play an important role in regulating the immune system through hormones?

    From my understanding it’s almost impossible to NOT have a compromised immune system by the time CRC happens, since a faltering immune system is what allows it to get out of control. To me this suggests adrenal/thyroids are a component to solving this puzzle – tail chasing: what came first scenarios. I’m leaning towards the endocrine systems being the first to crash in the chain reaction but, that just this week. ha!

    As always, Jorge thank you for sharing your generous and informative insight.

    Natacha – you are correct in how leaky gut is part of this syndrome from my understanding but, I wouldn’t say foreign particles since they are mostly large molecule food particles the body doesn’t recognize as food and mounts an immune response to what it thinks are invaders. Think leaky gut causes much of the histamine reactions typical of CRC sufferers.

    Blessings

    Here you can learn still more:

    People can become
    unresponsive to an antigen by exposing them more or
    less continually to this antigen. This may be carried
    out with very high doses of antigen—called “highzone
    tolerance”—or with very low doses, “lowzone
    tolerance.” High-zone tolerance tends to
    render unresponsive both T- and B-cells, whereas
    low-zone tolerance weakens or blocks the T-cell
    response only. Thus the cellular immune response
    (T-cell) is more easily blocked, and such blockage
    is easier to sustain than is the humoral (B-cell)
    response. Furthermore, unresponsiveness (or
    “tolerance”) is easier to induce with soluble than
    with aggregated antigens.
    Thus immunologic tolerance is most readily
    achieved by more or less continual exposure to a
    soluble antigen, with T-cell paralysis being much
    easier to achieve and sustain.
    When mucous membranes are chronically infected
    by yeast, cells of the immune system are exposed
    continually to Candida antigens, thus satisfying the
    conditions for tolerance induction. This weakened
    immunologic response allows the yeast to thrive in
    the tissues, and a vicious cycle is established. An
    analagous situation has been reported in
    lepromatous leprosy. In this, the widely
    disseminated form of leprosy, impairment of the
    immune response has been demonstrated in vivo by
    reversion to negative of the lepromin skin test, and
    in vitro both by impairment of the lymphocyte
    transformation test on exposure to the leprosy
    bacillus or phytohemagglu-tinin, and release of the
    migration inhibitory factor on exposure to the
    bacillus. In the tuberculoid form of leprosy,
    however, this does not occur. This is the localized
    form of the disease, which carries a good
    prognosis. Thus widespread involvement is
    associated with impairment of the immune
    response.
    With Candida infection, as with leprosy, there
    may be for each individual a critical point beyond
    which the total area of involvement is such that the
    antigenic stimulus paralyzes rather than stimulates
    the immune system, particularly the T-cell compartment.
    Until this state of immunologic
    unresponsiveness is broken, drug therapy of the
    yeast infection will be less than fully effective.

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