Apo-Lactoferrin

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  • #88659

    Able900
    Spectator
    Topics: 92
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    A substance by the name of “lactoferrin’ (Apo-Lactoferrin) has been added to the list of supplements recommended on in the forum’s protocol. Lactoferrin (Apo-Lactoferrin) is a globular protein or a spheroprotein found in human and animal milk.

    The Link Between Candida and Iron Deficiency Anemia

    If you have a mild to strong Candida infestation and it is allowed to continue, then over a period of time it’s also possible or even probable that you will eventually contract iron deficiency anemia.

    According to a study reported in the journal, “Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy,” iron can improve the immune system’s function while at the same time increasing the susceptibility of Candida to antifungals. However, ironically, iron can also improve the ability of Candida albicans to invade human cells, which, at least in theory would only make the infestation worse. So, as you can imagine, the unfortunate aspect of taking an iron supplement is that it can possibly promote a Candida infestation by benefiting the Candida.

    The spheroprotein, lactoferrin, has the ability of binding to free iron and thereby preventing the Candida infestation from becoming worse due to iron, but at the same time, those sufferers with specific types of anemia can also have low levels of lactoferrin and therefore be more susceptible to Candida infections. Since lactoferrin binds so easily with iron, it improves the body’s uptake of iron therefore helping to prevent iron deficiency and anemia. Lactoferrin also helps to maintain excellent levels of beneficial bacteria in the intestinal tract which is a big advantage in a good Candida treatment.

    Lactoferrin is found most often in human and cow’s milk; however, it’s also available in over-the-counter supplements. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration granted a GRAS (generally-recognized-as-safe) status to milk-derived lactoferrin supplementation.

    Take this supplement during or immediately after a meal.

    [h]IMPORTANT:

    A lot of people are allergic to lactoferrin and apo-lactoferrin. Start with a small amount and watch carefully for allergic reactions.

    Take this supplement only for only three days, then stop taking it for a week, then three more days, etc.

    I wouldn’t take Apo L for more than 27 days total. That’s 9 x 3 days with a week off every 3 days; but this is only if you’re absolutely sure that you need it and that you need it for that long. It wouldn’t hurt to have your iron checked halfway through.

    Take Apo L several hours apart from any probiotic you may be taking.

    The natural and best way to obtain iron is still from your diet.
    [/h]

    Able

    #88666

    Javizy
    Member
    Topics: 20
    Replies: 945

    I’m pretty sure it can tackle biofilms too. It’s secreted in healthy saliva and helps to break down plaque in the mouth. It was also an ingredient in a mouthwash I bought (PBF Biotene I think it was). I’ve never tried it as a supplement, but I probably get a good dose from dairy.

    #90590

    Angor
    Member
    Topics: 47
    Replies: 136

    I’ve had Lactoferrin in mind for some time now. Did anyone try it yet? What brand should you buy? It’s impossible to get a hold of in sweden, so where can I order it from? Thanks.

    #90719

    soon
    Member
    Topics: 3
    Replies: 27

    Fuck yeah. Thanks for the info!

    #90751

    dvjorge
    Participant
    Topics: 283
    Replies: 1368

    It should be Apo-Lactoferrin !!!

    #90819

    Bucephalus
    Member
    Topics: 6
    Replies: 87

    I just googled apolactoferrin, and it directed me to lactoferrin on wikipedia.
    So what is it, are these the same thing or not?
    David.

    #91215

    Able900
    Spectator
    Topics: 92
    Replies: 4811

    dvjorge;29144 wrote: It should be Apo-Lactoferrin !!!

    Thanks, Jorge.

    Your statement is correct because apo-lactoferrin is effective against Candida. It works both as a synergistic property with other antifungals or by itself in preventing Candida from turning hyphal. As Javizy pointed out, it prevents biofilms from forming and it’s believed tp be capable of breaking down existing biofilms.

    Research: http://www.springerlink.com/content/j77271455237832q/

    Able

    #91247

    benc
    Member
    Topics: 67
    Replies: 419

    Will you be getting enough if you drink kefir daily?

    #91253

    dvjorge
    Participant
    Topics: 283
    Replies: 1368

    Abstract
    Candida albicans was found to be highly susceptible to inhibition and inactivation by lactoferricin B, a peptide produced by enzymatic cleavage of bovine lactoferrin. Effective concentrations of the peptide varied within the range of 18 to 150 g/ml depending on the strain and the culture medium used. Its effect was lethal, causing a rapid loss of colony-forming capability. 14C-labeled lactoferricin B bound to C. albicans and the rate of binding appeared to be consistent with the rate of killing induced by the peptide. The extent of binding was diminished in the presence of Mg2+ or Ca2+ ions which acted to reduce its anticandidal effectiveness. Binding occurred optimally at pH 6.0 and killing was maximal near the same pH. Such evidence suggests the lethal effect of lactoferricin B results from its direct interaction with the cell surface. Cells exposed to lactoferricin B exhibited profound ultrastructural damage which appeared to reflect its induction of an autolytic response. These findings suggest that active peptides of lactoferrin could potentially contribute to the host defense against C. albicans.

    Abstract
    The effects of lactoferrin (LF), an antimicrobial protein secreted in body fluids, and its peptides in combination with azole antifungal agents were investigated by the micro-broth-dilution method in a study of Candida albicans. In the case of LF, its pepsin hydrolysate (LFhyd) or the LF-derived antimicrobial peptide Lactoferricin B (LF-B), the concentrations required to inhibit the growth of Candida decreased in the presence of relatively low concentrations of clotrimazole (CTZ). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of all azole antifungal agents tested was reduced by 1/4-1/16 in the presence of a sub-MIC level of each of these LF-related substances. Polyene and fluoropyrimidine antifungal agents did not show such a combined effect with these LF-related substances. The anti-Candida activity of LF or LF-B in combination with CTZ was shown to be synergistic by checkerboard analysis. These results indicate that LF-related substances function cooperatively with azole antifungal agents against C. albicans.

    IT MUST BE APO-LACTOFERRIN

    Abstract

    Since iron-binding proteins in serum and external secretions inhibit growth of certain microorganisms, the effect of lactoferrin on growth of Candida albicans was determined. The iron-unsaturated protein markedly impaired replication of the yeast, and the growth-inhibitory property was lost when lactoferrin was saturated with iron.

    #94496

    PhoebeB
    Member
    Topics: 0
    Replies: 7

    All this is useful information, but what about the fact that apo-lactoferrin derives from milk? All relative products I’ve found so far are from whey.

    #95839

    fixme
    Participant
    Topics: 7
    Replies: 101

    How many times a day should we take Apo-Lactoferrin?

    #95866

    Emsmith
    Participant
    Topics: 25
    Replies: 137

    I’ve been taking mine once daily.

    #96148

    rebeccaouellet
    Member
    Topics: 1
    Replies: 4

    PhoebeB;32937 wrote: All this is useful information, but what about the fact that apo-lactoferrin derives from milk? All relative products I’ve found so far are from whey.

    I was wondering the same thing. I cannot do any dairy. Is this safe for me?

    #96180

    Kag
    Member
    Topics: 18
    Replies: 402

    I actually have slight anemia which is common for women of child-bearing age. I take an iron supplement probably every other day. So are you telling me that this is bad for me as well…. SMH…..

    #96910

    Able900
    Spectator
    Topics: 92
    Replies: 4811

    All this is useful information, but what about the fact that apo-lactoferrin derives from milk? All relative products I’ve found so far are from whey.

    As you’ve pointed out, you wouldn’t be drinking the milk and therefore the whey to obtain the Apo-lactoferrin, you would be taking a supplement of Glycoproteins which were extracted from the original substance.

    How many times a day should we take Apo-Lactoferrin?

    According to research, 60 mg a day is suggested as replenishment for a normal healthy person. However, depending on the age and health of an individual, raising this dosage to 2 or 3 capsules per day has proven beneficial for certain individuals.

    Able

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