Anti-fungal foods question

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This topic contains 27 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  orka1998 6 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #94670

    alexalgebra
    Member
    Topics: 41
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    Hey all!

    Question for anyone that might know regarding anti-fungal foods, such as garlic, coconut oil, rutabaga, etc.

    Is it best to eat them raw? I’m assuming so.

    If you cook them, do they lose their properties a lot or just a little (or at all)?

    Does the way they are cooked or prepared change the anti-fungal properties? I cook my veggies a lot because I have such poor digestion right now :p

    Does garlic powder still work as an anti-fungal?

    If I make something, for example, like a stir fry with broccoli, cabbage, and onion, cooked with coconut oil, so that the veggies are cooked to softness/some browning – not burnt, is that still an anti-fungal meal?

    Thanks!
    Alex

    #94676

    shayfo
    Member
    Topics: 18
    Replies: 668

    I asked the other day if I can eat three antifungal foods daily instead of taking pill forms, and Able said that’s actually the ideal, since the foods are more powerful, and presumably also since the food forms of the antifungal compounds aren’t standardized exactly from coconut to coconut, so the candida can’t become resistant. I mentioned in that thread that I’ve been cooking them (with some raw garlic and some VCO off the spoon), and he didn’t mention that cooking would be an issue at all.

    Also, I definitely feel some die-off after I eat cooked brussels sprouts or rutabaga, so it must be doing something.

    #94677

    Able900
    Spectator
    Topics: 92
    Replies: 4811

    alexalgebra;33111 wrote: Question for anyone that might know regarding anti-fungal foods, such as garlic, coconut oil, rutabaga, etc.Is it best to eat them raw? I’m assuming so.

    Actually the healthiest way to cook vegetables is to lightly steam them, then you can drizzle the coconut oil over the vegetables. It’s easier for your body to break the fibers down, but it doesn’t cook away the vitamins and minerals.

    If you cook them, do they lose their properties a lot or just a little (or at all)?

    Yes, especially if you boil them too long. Again, the healthiest way is to steam lightly. You can also “lightly” bake slices of the rutabaga in the oven.

    Does the way they are cooked or prepared change the anti-fungal properties? I cook my veggies a lot because I have such poor digestion right now :p

    Why don’t you try steaming your vegetables instead of boiling?

    Does garlic powder still work as an anti-fungal?

    I’m sure the powder wouldn’t have the same benefits or the same antifungal properties.

    Able

    #94680

    alexalgebra
    Member
    Topics: 41
    Replies: 643

    Thanks for the info!

    This is probably a really dumb question, but bear in mind before all of this, I literally couldn’t cook anything besides macaroni from a box and PBJ…how do you steam? Do you need to have a steamer?

    #94681

    mrs.candida
    Member
    Topics: 53
    Replies: 452

    As for the coconut oil, I just researched this, it doesn’t loose it’s beneficial properties at any temperature. The only problem with coconut oil is melting it in the microwave. There are claims, but no research to prove , that microwaves will destroy the beneficial properties of the oil. Set a glass into a bowl of hot water to melt your coconut oil.

    #94682

    mrs.candida
    Member
    Topics: 53
    Replies: 452

    My steamer is a metal basket that sits inside a pot. It’s fairly cheap. I would say you do not have to go out and buy a steamer.

    #94683

    alexalgebra
    Member
    Topics: 41
    Replies: 643

    Oooh…thanks for the melting tip…had been wondering about that.

    #94688

    Danny33
    Member
    Topics: 25
    Replies: 362

    This is probably a really dumb question, but bear in mind before all of this, I literally couldn’t cook anything besides macaroni from a box and PBJ…how do you steam? Do you need to have a steamer?

    Alex,
    If were to Google “How to steam vegetables” you can literally find a hundred videos, instructions, and information about the subject.

    Google knows all!

    #94700

    alexalgebra
    Member
    Topics: 41
    Replies: 643

    Danny – I know how to use Google…I just figured I would ask on here because one of my candida symptoms is getting easily overwhelmed and anxious by too much information. I did a google search and got billions of hits…too many for me to process today as I’m having kind of a rough day after overexerting myself yesterday. I’d rather get a tip from one person on this nice, easy to digest forum than spend hours panicking over which google result is going to tell me the best answer :p

    #94707

    shayfo
    Member
    Topics: 18
    Replies: 668

    I have a steamer rack that came with my rice cooker, and it fits over a small frying pan I have, but I have also used a metal colander over a large-ish pot. It’s a lot quicker if you can fit or semi-fit a lid over it, which is tougher with something like a colander.

    #94711

    raster
    Participant
    Topics: 104
    Replies: 6838

    I like to fry rutabega like potatoes. I cut it into cubes and fry it on a pan with some olive oil. So good! And it’ll improve your digestion as well…

    -raster

    #94716

    shayfo
    Member
    Topics: 18
    Replies: 668

    kinda like raster is saying, i fried rutabaga cut into potato wedge/steak fry shapes last night, in coconut oil, then added smoked paprika, sea salt, and cracked pepper. super good.

    #94725

    Able900
    Spectator
    Topics: 92
    Replies: 4811

    I know most of you folks don’t need to or want to spend extra money right now, but just for future reference; vegetables are better for you when they’re steamed very lightly because it’s easier for them to be broken down by the body plus they cause less digestion problems than raw. Plus it leaves a lot of the vitamins and minerals in the vegetables, both which are lost when veggies are boiled in a pot of water too long. So with that information in mind; there is such a thing as “waterless cookware” on the market. It’s normally constructed of 304 surgical stainless steel and yes, I’m afraid it’s a bit expensive when purchased at retail, but the dealers who sell it over the internet sell at wholesale prices.
    This is extremely healthy cookware which a lot of doctors are now recommending to their patients. If you ever decide to purchase this type of cookware, purchase it from one of the many stores online because you’ll save tons of money, and be sure that the pots themselves come with a “Lifetime Warranty” because the waterless cookware is available with this warranty.

    Now, since you probably don’t want to spend a lot of money on waterless pots right now, what the members have written above is a lot of useful information. A steamer basket which fits into another pot is usually fairly cheap and can also be used for steaming. You simply place a small amount of water in a saucepan, hang the basket over the side (the baskets usually have a clip which works as a hanger), and place your vegetables in the basket. You can place a lid over the basket if you like to keep the steam from escaping, but remember that you don’t need to prolong the time that you actually steam the vegetables. You want the vegetables to remain firm but not difficult to chew, and you certainly don’t want them to be mushy, really soft, or limp.

    And, Alex, I agree with you about Google; why go sifting through dozens of sites when you can come and ask your question on the forum and receive several useful answers as well as tips.
    Of course, some of us are a little slow to answer sometimes, and I especially apologize for that today.

    Able

    #94727

    shayfo
    Member
    Topics: 18
    Replies: 668

    Someone was telling me about those pots recently, but they said they’re incredibly expensive. I’m happy enough to steam and lightly sautee. Boiled vegetables are kinda gross, unless they’re in soup.

    #94728

    alexalgebra
    Member
    Topics: 41
    Replies: 643

    Thank you for all the helpful replies!

    raster – I did make rutabaga “fries” the other day in the oven and they turned out okay, I think I would adjust the cooking time next time. I made turnip ones yesterday and they were PERFECT.

    shayfo, able – thanks for the tips on steaming! I will probably never be able to afford that waterless thing, but I just remembered I have one of those steamer attachments that came with my rice cooker…just haven’t used it in years. Will dust that off and give it a go.

    I generally don’t boil my veggies, except I stew my greens…I think that’s what it’s called? I put just a little water in the bottom of the pot, boil it, then add the greens and season/cook them until they’re wilted down. I drink the juice from the bottom though, so maybe I’m still retaining the nutrients? I hope so because it’s deeeeelish…the juice is my favorite part, haha. I just cook them until the stems get soft, not mushy.

    Sigh…this is such a long learning process…

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