Able,would this diet still allow probiotics to form colonies in the gut?

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This topic contains 13 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  jeff 7 years ago.

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  • #84924

    1000557
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    A diet of vegetables, minimal meat/chicken, eggs, fruit, legumes and nuts and some .It’s not the forum diet, but I’ve relaxed it while chelating.
    Thanks

    #84927

    Able900
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    1000557 wrote: A diet of vegetables, minimal meat/chicken, eggs, fruit, legumes and nuts and some. It’s not the forum diet, but I’ve relaxed it while chelating.
    Thanks

    As long as you continue the probiotics and kefir, yes this should do it, but be sure to eat a lot of green, fibrous vegetables as prebiotics. I’d be careful with the fruit also. Since you’re basically going off the diet, I would substitute all types of dried beans for red meat and pork but continue the chicken and fish. This will make a big difference for you in the end.

    Able

    #84928

    1000557
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    Hi so you don’t recommend legumes, nuts and fruits if you want colonization of probiotics or is that just for candida?
    I would have more meat and pork, however, I don’t eat pork and find it incredibly difficult to get organic meat and chicken. What do you suggest? I have bought sugar free, long-chain inulin and will be using this to feed the probiotics. If you feed probiotics with prebiotics, is there more of a chance of colonizing?
    Thanks

    #84930

    Able900
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    1000557 wrote: Hi so you don’t recommend legumes, nuts and fruits if you want colonization of probiotics or is that just for candida?

    I didn’t say not to have legumes, like beans, you can have these in place of the meat part of the time. If you’re going off the diet, of course fruit is a food that’s not on the diet. I’m just saying that it can play a part in building a good environment for the Candida to repopulate.

    I would have more meat and pork, however, I don’t eat pork and find it incredibly difficult to get organic meat and chicken. What do you suggest?

    Beans.

    I have bought sugar free, long-chain inulin and will be using this to feed the probiotics. If you feed probiotics with prebiotics, is there more of a chance of colonizing?

    Yes.

    #84933

    1000557
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    Thanks

    #84934

    raster
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    I’d personally stay away from fruit until you are basically symptom free; for me this was at the 10 month mark of the diet. The only fruit I found to be a benefit while on the diet was blueberries which is anti-inflammatory and they have other health properties. 15 blueberries is about 8g of sugar. If this is your only bad food item, I think you would be doing fine. But combined with some beef, pork, and nuts…I am unsure how well you would heal.

    Another knock on fruits is how fresh they are; if they are grown locally and were picked rather soon before you eat them…this would be way better than having 1-2 week old fruit that was shipped across the world to your local supermarket.

    I would try your best to go organic if possible; there are farms on the internet that sell organic meat way cheaper than the supermarket that can ship to your home. Sausage is relatively cheap and is one of those items I eat a lot on the diet.

    -raster

    #84987

    1000557
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    what about wholemeal flour, keeping in kind that I am relaxing my diet but still want probiotics to colonize (will be taking prebiotics also)
    Thanks

    #84995

    Able900
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    1000557 wrote: what about wholemeal flour, keeping in kind that I am relaxing my diet but still want probiotics to colonize (will be taking prebiotics also)

    Wholemeal flour is nothing more than wholewheat flour. You already know what wheat does with a Candida infestation as well as other foods, so these decisions in general are really more about your choices rather than what one of the experts thinks.

    Able

    #84998

    1000557
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    But I don’t know anything about colonization! I don;t mind if the candida if fed a little for now as long as probiotics colonize.
    Will they colonize if I have wholewheat flour?

    #85000

    Able900
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    1000557 wrote: But I don’t know anything about colonization! I don;t mind if the candida if fed a little for now as long as probiotics colonize.
    Will they colonize if I have wholewheat flour?

    Yes, providing you follow the protocol as far as obtaining kefir and probiotics and continue to feed the bacteria.
    However, feeding the Candida continually can hamper the growth and colonization of bacteria by allowing the Candida to literally “take over” the intestines therefore crowding the beneficial bacteria out. Candida are capable of doing this since this is how a person contracts an overgrowth in the first place.

    Able

    #85002

    Javizy
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    Topics: 20
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    Wholewheat flour has concentrated amounts of everything that’s bad about wheat. It has so much phytate that people eating wholewheat end up absorbing less minerals than people eating white flour. The fibre literally damages your bowels too; that’s how it works as a laxative (your immune system secretes mucous in response to the damage). If you have any leaky gut issues whatsoever, then you’re in trouble too. Wholewheat is a pseudo-health food. If you crave wheat, eat it refined with something to blunt the GI. Better yet go with something less toxic like buckwheat, rice or gram flour. If you eat legumes, you should prepare them thoroughly to reduce their toxins too (soak or sprout, rinse, cook thoroughly etc). Preparing wheat in this way can reduce a lot of what’s bad about it, but obviously nobody does that.

    #85016

    jeff
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    Excuse my ignorance, but what is the difference between Kefir and organic greek yoghurt or goats yoghurt?

    #85019

    raster
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    Hello Jeff,

    Kefir is essentially “liquid yogurt” and typically contains the most strains out of all yogurt related products. It basically is fermented milk that has started to turn into yogurt and it gets clumpy. It never turns into yogurt tho…

    Greek yogurt is like regular yogurt but is made by a special process. It contains the most strains of beneficial bacteria out of all of the yogurt’s out there.

    Goat’s yogurt is like regular yogurt but made with goat’s milk. Candida sufferer’s typically are less allergic to goat’s milk than cow’s milk so thats why its a better choice. There is also goat’s kefir made from goat’s milk.

    -raster

    #85086

    jeff
    Member
    Topics: 0
    Replies: 3

    thx so much Raster.

    So looks like kefir is definitely the way to go!

    just one more question, most of the recipes i see involve milk, if im lactose intolerant is this a problem, or does the fermentation process render it out?

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