Reply To: Lavender oil vs oregano oil

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dvjorge
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jameskep;46231 wrote: Seems like Lavender oil would have just as much or more anti-candida activity as oregano oil. Lavender oil is much less irritating as oregano oil. Lavender oil is a great choice for topical infections. For people that have a more sensitive/inflammed GI tract seems like Lavender oil would be a much better choice than oregano oil.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16178366

Note: Lavender oil(2%) killed 100% of the C. Albicans within 15min.

James,

I believe Carvacrol is stronger. Carvacrol is fungicidal and able to disrupt mature biofilms.

Oregano oil has a mix of Carvacrol and Eugenol. Eugenol is also an strong antifungal.

Cinamaldehyde present in Cinnamon Oil is also fungicidal but toxic.

Jorge.

ABSTRACT

Carvacrol and eugenol, the main (phenolic) components of essential oils of some aromatic plants, were evaluated for their therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of experimental oral candidiasis induced by Candida albicans in immunosuppressed rats. This anticandidal activity was analyzed by microbiological and histopathological techniques, and it was compared with that of nystatin, which was used as a positive control. Microbiologically, carvacrol and eugenol significantly (p<0.05) reduced the number of colony forming units (CFU) sampled from the oral cavity of rats treated for eight consecutive days, compared to untreated control rats. Treatment with nystatin gave similar results. Histologically, the untreated control animals showed numerous hyphae on the epithelium of the dorsal surface of the tongue. In contrast no hyphal colonization of the epithelium was seen in carvacrol-treated animals, while in rats treated with eugenol, only a few focalized zones of the dorsal surface of the tongue were occupied by hyphae. In the nystatin treated group, hyphae were found in the folds of the tongue mucosa. Thus, the histological data were confirmed by the microbiological tests for carvacrol and eugenol, but not for the nystatin-treated group. Therefore, carvacrol and eugenol could be considered as strong antifungal agents and could be proposed as therapeutic agents for oral candidiasis.

Abstract

Objectives: Anticandidal activity of carvacrol and eugenol, the major phenolic components of oregano and clove essential oils, respectively, were tested in vivo.

Methods: Efficacy evaluation of carvacrol and eugenol in the prophylaxis and treatment of experimental vaginal candidiasis was performed in immunosuppressed rats. The anticandidal activity was analysed by microbiological and histological techniques and was compared with that of nystatin.

Results: Microbiologically, prophylactic treatment with carvacrol eradicated the vaginal fungal burden of infected rats, whereas eugenol reduced the number of colony counts of Candida albicans in vaginas of infected rats by 98.9% 10 days after inoculation. Therapeutic treatment for 7 consecutive days with carvacrol was able to eradicate the vaginal candidal burden in 7/9 of the infected rats and reduced the number of colony counts of C. albicans in vaginas of the two remaining rats by 98%. Treatment with eugenol completely cured 2/9 of the infected animals, but the 7/9 still infected showed an 84% reduction of colony counts of C. albicans in their vaginas. Histologically, in all treated rats, no Candida organisms were found in the lumina of the vagina; this was in contrast to control groups in which many yeasts, strongly stained with periodic acid-Schiff, were observed. The results obtained with nystatin used at 10-fold minimal inhibitory concentration confirm the validity of this model.

Conclusions: Carvacrol and eugenol could be considered as promising products in the treatment of vaginal candidiasis. This work is a preliminary contribution to the development of a new generation of efficient and natural antifungal agents for curative treatment and prophylaxis.

Study of anticandidal activity of carvacrol and eugenol in vitro and in vivo.
Chami N, Bennis S, Chami F, Aboussekhra A, Remmal A.
Source
Faculté des Sciences de Fès, Laboratoire de Biotechnologie, Atlas Fes, Morocco.
Abstract
BACKGROUND/AIMS:
The mechanism of the anticandidal action of the major phenolic components of oregano and clove essential oils – carvacrol and eugenol – was studied. This activity was also evaluated for the therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of the experimental oral candidiasis induced by Candida albicans in immunosuppressed rats.
METHODS:
In vitro, the addition of carvacrol at 0.1% or eugenol at 0.2% during the exponential growth of C. albicans was evaluated. The release of substances absorbing at 280 nm by cells treated with these two components was also measured spectrophotometrically. In vivo, oral candidiasis in immunosuppressed rats was established by inoculating 3 x 10(8) cells of C. albicans with a cotton swab on three alternate days. The number of colony counts was evaluated from the oral cavity of rats treated for eight consecutive days with carvacrol, eugenol or nystatin and compared to untreated controls.
RESULTS:
Carvacrol and eugenol were fungicidal in exponentially growing C. albicans. Interestingly, this fungicidal effect was accompanied by the release of substances absorbing at 280 nm. In an immunosuppressed rat model of oral candidiasis, carvacrol or eugenol treatment significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the number of colony counts sampled from the oral cavity of rats treated for eight consecutive days compared to untreated control rats. Similar results were obtained with nystatin used as a reference treatment.
CONCLUSION:
The in vitro results indicated that both carvacrol and eugenol exerted an anticandidal effect by a mechanism implicating an important envelope damage. Their in vivo efficacy on experimental oral candidiasis leads us to consider them as possible antifungal agents.

[h]In vitro activity of terpenes against Candida biofilms.[/h]
Dalleau S, Cateau E, Bergès T, Berjeaud JM, Imbert C.
Source
UMR 6008, Université de Poitiers, CNRS, 6 rue de la Milètrie, BP 199, 86034 Poitiers Cedex, France.
Abstract
The antibiofilm activity of 10 terpenes was tested in vitro against three Candida species by 24-h treatment of biofilms aged 1-5 days. Treatment of 24-h-old Candida albicans biofilms with carvacrol, geraniol or thymol (0.06%) resulted in >80% inhibition. Carvacrol (0.03%) inhibition was > or =75% independent of the age of the C. albicans biofilm. Carvacrol (0.125%) inhibition was >75% against Candida glabrata and Candida parapsilosis biofilms. Geraniol (> or =0.125%) and thymol (0.06% or 0.125%) inhibition was >75% against C. parapsilosis biofilms whatever their age. This study demonstrates the antibiofilm activity of terpenes and points out the exceptional efficiency of carvacrol, geraniol and thymol, which could represent candidates in the treatment of candidiasis associated with medical devices.[h][/h]